Educational Seminars

Celebrating the Spirit of
Our People and Our Industry

Many of this year's seminars are on topics of interest and value to all segments of the industry,
while some seminars are more industry-segment specific.
Conference registrants are free to attend any seminar of their choice.

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 Tourism                       Lodging                   Restaurants

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Standing Out From All The Rest:
Discovering and Promoting Your Unique Selling Proposition


Travelers are presented with so many destinations and decisions – so hospitality and tourism-related businesses and organizations often have to ask: "How do we make ourselves stand out?"

In this seminar, you will learn how to assess, evaluate and determine your unique selling proposition (USP). You will also learn about best practices and proven methods to capture and present those USPs in print and digital digital outlets,  From preparation, production and placement, you will see how you can highlight your destination in a way that is authentic and distinct.

Lindsey Miller
Designsensory

Jessica Johnson
Designsensory

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Getting in the Game:
Changing Trends in Amateur Sports Marketing


Amateur sports continues to the be one of the hottest tourism markets in the country, and every one wants to get in the game! In small and large communities, all segments of the industry - DMOs, attractions, lodging properties and restaurants - have discovered that amateur sports is generating travel, overnight stays, retail and food purchases, and great exposure for the destination.


The amateur sports market segment continues to evolve and change, as do the methods of finding, marketing to, attracting, and servicing this specialized niche group.  This seminar will focus on those changes, trends, and hot-button topics to follow in the future.

Al Kidd
National Association
of Sports Commissions

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Tennessee's Hospitality & Tourism Industry:
On the Front Lines in the Fight Against Human Trafficking


In the state of Tennessee, 94 teens a month are deceived, tormented and sold, usually for sex. The hospitality and tourism industry is often unintentionally involved, with victims being transported from location to location, being housed in local lodging, and traffickers using the cover of local events and attractions to hide their activities and attract clients.

Tourism and hospitality stakeholders are often unaware of the signs of this horrific illegal activity.  This seminar will assist DMO's, attractions, hotels, restaurants and other's involved in the state's hospitality and tourism industry to recognize victims, learn how to report suspicious activity, and provide tools for training front-line employees in recognizing and combatting this terrible crime.

Jill Rutter
End Slavery Tennessee

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Digital Marketing Hacks and Tech Innovation
For the Hospitality and Tourism Industry

 

Digital marketing can be one of the most effective ways to reach your target audience. But the digital world is an ever-evolving and rapidly changing place.  What worked in the past may not be as effective as it once was or yield the same results.  In today's digital marketplace, you need to use innovative and smart techniques to stand out from your competitors.


This seminar will provide some of the newest and most effective "hacks" to improve your digital marketing strategy, including social media advertising and best practices for leveraging photo and video content across platforms. This discussion will include a presentation of the latest innovations that will soon change the customer experience, such as augmented reality and virtual reality.

Josh Collins
Visit Franklin

Erin Duvall
Tennessee Department
of Tourist Development

Dave Jones
Tennessee Department
of Tourist Development

Brian Yamada
VML

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Build It and They Will Come:
Tourism Product Development and Successful Storytelling


Before you tell your story, you have to identify what makes your destination unique and sets it apart from other places. And, you have to get buy in and participation from your community – that usually requires the commitment of time, money and creativity. Hear about three Tennessee success stories, the challenges along the way and ultimately how they inspire visitors searching for what they are offering.

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Kim Holmberg
Journal Communications

Rene Lance
South Central Tennessee Tourism Association

Dennis Tumlin
Rhea Economic &
Tourism Council

Melissa Woody
Cleveland/Bradley County
Chamber of Commerce

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The ABCs of Your DMO's ROI:
Demonstrating the Value of Your Funding & Program of Work


As a general rule, DMOs/CVBs correctly focus on the external: telling their story to potential visitors who do not live in the community.  Unfortunately, they sometimes do so without also developing and executing a good internal message: letting local decision makers, opinion influencers, and citizens know about the organization's work and it's economic impact.  As a result, DMOs/CVBs are increasingly under pressure to show accountability and a return on investment (ROI) for their funding.
 

Join us for this panel of industry professionals discuss the challenges they have faced, lessons learned and methods used in their efforts to communicate the value of investing in tourism and returns to their communities.

Melanie Beauchamp
Tennessee Department
of Tourist Development

Jenna Cole-Wilson
Benton County/Camden
Chamber of Commerce

Dave Santucci
Chattanooga Convention
& Visitors Bureau

Deborah Warnick
Williamson County

Convention & Visitors Bureau

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Deal With It: Addressing Performance Problems


Performance-based coaching is one of the most effective ways to improve business results.  We’ll discuss how to lay the foundation for great performance, prepare for the coaching and counseling conversation, manage the conversation appropriately and legally, place ownership of the problem’s resolution with your employee, and get the desired outcome without losing the employee’s commitment.

Judy King
Quality Management
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Improving the Food Safety Culture in Your Workplace


Food safety culture is often described as ‘The way we do things around here’. It can be negative, as when managers and/or their teams don’t see the importance of food safety and therefore don’t follow proper procedures. A positive food safety culture is when food hygiene is a high priority for both managers and team members. This not only leads to a safer environment for customers, it also produces improved employee morale, lower staff turnover and greater staff commitment.

Jim Lucas
Sysco

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Employee Retention Strategies That Work


You’ve found talent you’d love to keep, yet doing so in this hypercompetitive market is more and more challenging.  Developing a magnetic culture that draws great staff and encourages them to stay will be explored.  You’ll walk away with valuable “tried and true”, as well as innovative, tips for keeping your staff and having them engaged!

Judy King
Quality Management
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Special Education/Professional Development Seminar:
Guest Service Gold®
Training & Certification
Wednesday, October 4, 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Separate Registration & Fee Required
Sponsored by and Fee Underwritten by TnHTA


Click HERE for more information and registration